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MICRO-PUCER LES POPULATIONS (PARTIE 2)
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MessagePosté le: Mar 18 Oct - 07:12 (2016)    Sujet du message: MHS GENESIS TO LAUNCH IN FEBUARY 2017 / BONO TO AFCEA: NEW ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD IS KEY FOR FUTURE OF ENGAGING MILITARY HEALTH PATIENTS Répondre en citant



MHS GENESIS TO LAUNCH IN FEBUARY 2017 


 

MHS GENESIS logo


HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 2016



VIDEO : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aTbe6ybPa8g

-----

10/13/2016 By: Military Health System Communications Office Share

Recommended Content:
Military Health System Electronic Health Record, MHS GENESIS, Electronic Health Record Modernization & Interoperability
 
The Program Executive Office Defense Healthcare Management Systems announced Oct. 11, 2016, the initial deployment of MHS GENESIS, the Military Health System’s (MHS) electronic health record, will take place at Fairchild Air Force Base, Wash., in February 2017.

The updated schedule provides additional time for the DoD Healthcare Management System Modernization program and its industry partner, Leidos Partnership for Defense Health, to expand the capabilities included in initial deployment, improving the user experience for health care providers and MHS beneficiaries. MHS GENESIS is a single, integrated medical and dental electronic health record for use across the MHS.

“The time we are investing in the program now will help us ensure success in the future, providing the best possible user experience to our beneficiaries and healthcare providers from day one,” said Stacy Cummings, program executive officer, Defense Healthcare Management System.

Deployment at additional inpatient facilities in the Pacific Northwest is scheduled to start as early as June 2017. This effort now incorporates additional capabilities planned for release later in the deployment schedule. The modified schedule will not impact MHS GENESIS’ full deployment target of 2022.

 “We want to be able to provide the best possible user experience, and the additional time we are investing will help us accomplish this,” said Dr. Paul Cordts, incoming functional champion for the Military Health System. “We are working closely with our provider community to make sure the processes and workflows built into MHS GENESIS provide the best product for our medical teams on day one.”

http://www.health.mil/News/Articles/2016/10/13/MHS-GENESIS-to-launch-in-Feb…

BONO TO AFCEA: NEW ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD IS KEY FOR FUTURE OF ENGAGING MILITARY HEALTH  PATIENTS

Navy Vice Adm. Raquel Bono, director of the Defense Health Agency, said military members have to be ready to go anywhere in the world on short notice. To help solve the complexity of care with that readiness aspect, Bono pointed to the Military Health System’s new electronic health record, MHS GENESIS, as key to helping conversations between doctors and patients, no matter where people are. (Courtesy photo)

10/14/2016 By: Military Health System Communications Office Share

Recommended Content:

Technology, Military Health System Electronic Health Record, MHS GENESIS
 
The success of health care, especially in the military, depends on the ability of patients to interact with doctors, nurses and providers. And that success in the future will include streamlining and enhancing the effectiveness of electronic devices and the electronic health records that connect everyone, including the consumers of health care.

“Part of the driver for change in the health care arena is going to be our patients,” said Navy Vice Adm. Raquel Bono, director of the Defense Health Agency.

“We want our patients to be a part of their health care. The more patients become interested and involved in their health data, the more they’re going to be driving some of the impetus for change.”

That’s why Bono was the keynote speaker during the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) Bethesda, Maryland chapter Health IT Day 2016, a gathering of approximately 1,000 workers, including the Departments of Defense, Veterans Affairs and Health and Human Services, as well as private information technology industry representatives. Bono explained to attendees that interoperability – sharing health information back and forth between providers and patients, from stateside clinics to battlefield treatment centers – is critically important in health care.

“Our patients are very mobile, and the care we can provide to our patients is also very complex,” said Bono, pointing out that interoperability starts within military hospitals and clinics and cited her own personal experience when she was a hospital commander. “If I can’t move to greater interoperability within my hospital walls, it’s going to be a lot harder for me to do that beyond my hospital walls.”

Bono said military members have to be ready to go anywhere in the world on short notice. To help solve the complexity of care with that readiness aspect, Bono pointed to the Military Health System’s (MHS) new electronic health record, MHS GENESIS, as key to helping conversations between doctors and patients, no matter where people are. MHS GENESIS is a single, integrated medical and dental electronic health record for use across the MHS. The commercial-off-the-shelf system is being rolled out starting in February in the Pacific Northwest, with full implementation throughout the system in about six years. “We had a wonderful exchange in building the requirements for this with industry,” said Bono. “It really alerted us to some of the solutions that were out there we were looking for, recognizing that we have some unique challenges with our globally distributed patient population and also our providers and military treatment facilities. We wanted to launch a product that from day one worked for providers, but especially for our patients.”

Bono said the ability to take care of military members and their families relies on the success of MHS GENESIS and making sure it’s fully operational.

“It’s about engaging the patients and having them be part of the team and part of their health care,” said Bono. “

Bono said the level of injuries from the past decade and a half of warfare has been worse than anyone could imagine. But she said the survival rate of those hurt is the highest in the history of warfare. Taking care of the invisible wounds of war, such as some forms of traumatic brain injury, and the impact of those injuries to the families back home, has been more challenging.

“It wasn’t enough just to have all the clinical experts taking care of our wounded warriors,” said Bono. “We realized a critical aspect of taking care of our patients meant involving their support network and their families. Information we were able to share within their network was often times what advanced and amplified the care we were trying to give. We looked at the electronic health record as an enabler for that kind of engagement. We are now able to create shared decision making of that care.”

http://www.health.mil/News/Articles/2016/10/14/Bono-to-AFCEA-New-electronic…


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MessagePosté le: Mar 18 Oct - 07:12 (2016)    Sujet du message: Publicité

PublicitéSupprimer les publicités ?
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MessagePosté le: Mer 19 Oct - 06:58 (2016)    Sujet du message: IMPROVING PATIENT CARE WITH LIMDU SMART / NAVY UPDATES LIMITED DUTY TRACKING SYSTEM Répondre en citant



IMPROVING PATIENT CARE WITH LIMDU SMART


Doug Lane Project Manager Profile

Project location: UCS HQ – and 82 naval sites around the world
Years with UCS: 5
Most interesting item on his desk: Hand-carved box from Haiti

What type of work do you do for the U.S. Navy?

I manage the design, development, testing, and implementation of IT systems for the U.S. Navy. Right now, we’re working on implementing the Limited Duty Sailor and Marine Readiness Tracker (LIMDU SMART) – a tool we developed at UCS to track Sailors and Marines placed on medically restricted duty. We built our solution with automated workflows that incorporate seamless integration with multiple Military Health System (MHS) systems so Navy leadership can have easy, at-a-glance visibility into patient care and all Sailors’ and Marines’ eligibility to deploy.

How has your work helped the client achieve their mission?

When our team first started, the Navy was operating on paper-based and antiquated systems that limited data visibility. Once we finish system implementation over the next 12 months, the LIMDU SMART solution will revolutionize the Navy’s visibility into patient care and deployability. For the first time in its history, the Navy will have complete visibility of its force strength. LIMDU SMART’s business intelligence capabilities will also enhance medical practices across the enterprise by helping physicians track patient recovery times, identify best practices for treatment, and disseminate lessons learned across the MHS.

What’s the most rewarding aspect of working on your project and at UCS?

On a daily basis, I work with motivated, driven, and exceptionally talented Service members. I get to see firsthand how the work we do not only supports those individuals, but also the Navy’s broader wounded, ill, and injured population. I am also privileged to work with an equally gifted group of professionals at UCS, both on my team and throughout the company. I enjoy the opportunity to support their professional development and love watching them take ownership of their roles to bring about mission success.

http://ucs-inc.com/case-studies/case-study-doug/

NAVY UPDATES LIMITED DUTY TRACKING SYSTEM

Story Number: NNS161018-05Release Date: 10/18/2016 8:30:00 AM

From Navy Personnel Command Public Affairs

MILLINGTON, Tenn. (NNS) -- The Navy is changing the way it tracks limited duty (LIMDU), according to NAVADMIN 218/16 released Oct. 17.

The LIMDU Sailor and Marine Readiness Tracker System (SMART) is replacing the Medical Evaluation Board System (MEDBOLTS) in managing the tracking of Temporary LIMDU (TLD).

According to NAVADMIN 218/16, to access the new system deployability coordinators must complete an online computer-based training course. The course can be accessed at http://edqtest.med.navy.mil/cbts/. After completing training, deployability coordinators can then access LIMDU SMART by contacting their patient administration office at their command's servicing medical treatment facility.

The transition to LIMDU SMART is scheduled to be completed by Sept. 30, with the exception of U.S. European Command (EUCOM) and U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM) medical training facilities.

For more information, read the message at http://www.npc.navy.mil/.

For more information, visit www.navy.mil, www.facebook.com/usnavy, or www.twitter.com/usnavy.

For more news from Navy Personnel Command, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/npc/.


http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=97223


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MessagePosté le: Ven 4 Nov - 01:26 (2016)    Sujet du message: COMME DES CHIENS : L’AUSTRALIE DEVIENT LE PREMIER PAYS A COMMENCER A MICROPUCER SA POPULATION / MILLIONS ALREADY CHIPPED!! RFID 666 IMPLANT DONE WITHOUT OBAMACARE !! Répondre en citant

COMME DES CHIENS : L’AUSTRALIE DEVIENT LE PREMIER PAYS A COMMENCER A MICROPUCER SA POPULATION

MILLIONS ALREADY CHIPPED!! RFID 666 IMPLANT DONE WITHOUT OBAMACARE !!



VIDEO : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kfmI-TZc6oE

Publié par wikistrike.com sur 3 Novembre 2016, 16:24pm

Catégories : #Science - technologie - web - recherche

 


L’Australie est peut-être le premier pays au monde à implanter des micropuces à sa population. NBC News avait prédit que tous les Américains aurait leur micropuce en 2017, mais ils semble que l’Australie les a déjà devancés.

En 2010, CBS News a annoncé que le gouvernement Australien avait un projet potentiel d’implantation de puces RFID dans les métiers liés au système de santé.

Actuellement, il semble que ce projet a commencé à se mettre en place, mais l’impulsion n’est pas le résultat de réformes proposées pour les soins de santé, mais plutôt d’une campagne de propagande intelligente qui assimile la puce RFID à nous rendre surhumains, et les gens commencent à supplier de se faire implanter.

Avec l’intitulé « Les Australiens adoptent la technologie de la puce qui rend surhumain », le plus grand média Australien, news.com.au (News Corp Australia) annonce :

Cela peut sembler de la science-fiction, mais des centaines d’Australiens se transforment en surhommes capables de déverrouiller les portes, allumer les lumières et se connecter à des ordinateurs avec un geste de la main.

Shanti Korporaal, de Sydney, se trouve au cœur du phénomène après avoir eu deux implants insérés sous la peau.

Maintenant, elle peut aller à son travail et dans sa voiture sans porter de carte ou de clés, et elle dit que son but ultime est de se passer complètement de son porte-monnaie et de ses cartes.

Elle a dit à news.com.au :

Vous pourriez mener votre vie sans avoir à vous soucier d’aucun mot de passe ou de codes PIN, c’est la même technologie que Paypal, donc j’espère qu’on pourra payer nos achats avec la puce.

Avec Opal, vous avez un numéro d’identification unique qui peut être programmé dans la puce. Toutes les portes fonctionnant avec une carte magnétique… il pourrait allumer votre ordinateur, votre photocopieuse. Les cartes de fidélité des magasins encombrent également votre portefeuille.

Les micropuces, qui sont de la taille d’un grain de riz, peuvent servir de carte de visite et transférer les coordonnées de vos contacts aux smartphones, et contenir des données médicales complexes.

Au cours de son entretien avec le média Australien, Shanti affirme que ses amis et sa famille sont jaloux de son mode de vie avec la micropuce;
Ma grand-mère en veut une. J’ai été beaucoup plus critiquée pour mes tatouages que pour la puce. Mes amis sont jaloux.

En fait, cette jeune femme de 27 ans s’est trouvée un marché à exploiter et avec son mari Skeeve Stevens, ils ont mis en place un service de distribution appelé « Pucez ma vie » avec lequel pour environ 80 $ à 140 $, les gens peuvent devenir des soi-disant « surhommes ».

Le même jour où cette nouvelle a été publiée, Shanti est apparue lors du lancement du jeu vidéo sur le thème très attendu des androïdes Deus Ex Mankind Divided (humanité divisée artificiellement) en même temps que la technologie implantable pionnière Américaine Amal Graafstra.

Comme vous pouvez le voir, la promotion du puçage RFID et de l’assimilation de la population humaine à des robots et à la technologie, est quelque chose qui sera très probablement vendu au public comme une aide pour devenir des « surhommes », mais ce qui est clair, si vous devenez en partie machine/ordinateur, cela signifie qu’il y aura quelqu’un qui pourra contrôler cette technologie. Si vous pensez que les élites ne sauraient pas profiter d’une telle opportunité exceptionnelle pour contrôler la population, vous ne connaissez manifestement pas l’histoire.

Amal Graafstra, qui est devenu l’un des premiers implantés d’une puce RFID du monde, en 2005, vient de faire la une récemment aux Etats-Unis avec un prototype de la première arme intelligente activée par la puce implantée, et il fait une immense propagande pour cette nouvelle technologie.

Il a écrit un livre, donné des conférences à TEDx et est également apparu dans un certain nombre de documentaires.

Dans une interview avec les médias Australiens, Amal a expliqué que la technologie qu’il a implantée dans son corps « m’a donné la capacité de communiquer avec les machines. Elles sont littéralement intégrées dans qui je suis ».

Shanti a souscrit à la culture qui domine la société aujourd’hui, qui est dominée par le fantasme de super-héros qui hypnotisent la population dans tous les cinémas du monde.

Depuis que j’ai vu des films comme Terminator, Matrix et Minority Report, je me suis demandé si nous pourrions vraiment vivre comme ça. Je me suis toujours demandé pourquoi nous ne vivions pas tous comme des « surhommes ».

Vous pouvez voir comment Shanti utilise la puce dans sa vie quotidienne dans la vidéo ci-dessous.

http://www.wikistrike.com/2016/11/comme-des-chiens-l-australie-devient-le-p…


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MessagePosté le: Jeu 17 Nov - 17:04 (2016)    Sujet du message: HOW I BECAME A CYBORG AND JOINED AN UNDERGROUND MEDICAL MOVEMENT Répondre en citant

HOW I BECAME A CYBORG AND JOINED AN UNDERGROUND MEDICAL MOVEMENT

Eternal malediction 


"9 And the third angel followed them, saying with a loud voice, If any man worship the beast and his image, and receive his mark in his forehead, or in his hand,
10 The same shall drink of the wine of the wrath of God, which is poured out without mixture into the cup of his indignation; and he shall be tormented with fire and brimstone in the presence of the holy angels, and in the presence of the Lamb:
11 And the smoke of their torment ascendeth up for ever and ever: and they have no rest day nor night, who worship the beast and his image, and whosoever receiveth the mark of his name.
12 Here is the patience of the saints: here are they that keep the commandments of God, and the faith of Jesus."
Revelation 14:9-12

Eternal benediction


"1 And I saw another sign in heaven, great and marvellous, seven angels having the seven last plagues; for in them is filled up the wrath of God.
And I saw as it were a sea of glass mingled with fire: and them that had gotten the victory over the beast, and over his image, and over his mark, and over the number of his name, stand on the sea of glass, having the harps of God.
And they sing the song of Moses the servant of God, and the song of the Lamb, saying, Great and marvellous are thy works, Lord God Almighty; just and true are thy ways, thou King of saints."
Revelation 15:1-5


-----

Published: Nov 17, 2016 7:23 a.m. ET

I tried biohacking: the use of tech implants to augment biology


  Scott Goldsmith
That’s a tech implant in there.


By JenniferBooton
Reporter

A man with metal horns protruding from his forehead and a split tongue poking out between his teeth advanced toward me with a scalpel. “I’ve never done this before,” he joked, inching closer.

A full-sleeve tattoo snaked out from beneath his black T-shirt, extending from a demon on his bicep to a skull on his fist. My eyes darted between skull and scalpel, then instinctively shut as I cringed, bracing for contact. Zack Watson, the inked-up body modification artist I’d hired — and drove seven hours from New York City to see — was about to sew a magnet under my skin.

The entire procedure took two minutes: Watson rubbed iodine on my right ring finger for sanitization, sliced open the soft pad of my fingertip, spread the edges of my skin apart with a curved hook and inserted a gold-plated, silicone-coated magnet the size of a pencil eraser inside with tweezers.

He then wiped up the blood with gauze, tied my finger shut with two stitches, and told me how to take care of the wound in the weeks following to make sure my body didn’t reject the magnet as it healed.


  Scott Goldsmith
Zack Watson sews a magnet into Jennifer Booton’s finger

Watson, who has several implants of his own, including silicone rectangles in his forearms that make his skin feel riblike, has been putting magnets and chips in people for three years at Ice 9 Studio, a tattoo and piercing parlor in Pittsburgh’s South Side Flats (though he recently left to open his own shop). His efforts are part of an underground movement in which people get implants as commonly as others get tattoos.

Interest has been spreading, with Watson quickly working through his latest supply of magnets. One woman recently traveled to Ice 9 Studio from Australia for a radio-frequency identification chip she uses to store personal information. Watson’s business frequently comes through his connection to Grindhouse Wetware, a Pittsburgh-area startup of “biohackers” who aim to augment the human body with technology. If successful, they’ll be at the vanguard of a movement called transhumanism that experiments with how technology can give us new, almost-superhuman, abilities.

Is biohacking the next phase of human evolution?(3:03)

An underground community is experimenting with tech implants that could disrupt the healthcare industry by pushing the limits of the human body. But will regulation stop their devices from wide adoption?

Biohacking enthusiasts have tinkered with electronic tattoos and subdermal — underneath-the-skin — implants for two decades, sharing their efforts in videos on YouTube and internet forums to spread and encourage innovation. Proponents believe smart implants represent the future of wearable technology, potentially making humans healthier and more efficient while providing new opportunity to consumer-technology companies such as Apple Inc. AAPL, -0.02%  and Alphabet Inc. GOOGL, +0.20% GOOG, +0.21%  that are investing heavily in technology that could revolutionize health care.

“You’re talking about extending your body to its maximum potential — and then beyond,” said Grindhouse co-founder Tim Cannon.


  Scott Goldsmith
Watson and his 6-month-old son, Thor, in Pittsburgh Big tech companies see big opportunity

In the late 1990s, an Englishman named Kevin Warwick was among the first people to put an RFID chip under his skin, letting him turn lights on and off and interact with appliances by scanning the chip with computer-controlled devices. Today, many people — including Warwick — are pushing that concept even further.

Amal Graafstra, who has tinkered with biohacking for at least a decade, is developing a smart gun that would use an RFID chip to ensure that it only fires in the hands of its owner. French tattoo artist JC Sheitan Tenet, who lost his right arm as a child and had to relearn how to draw with his non-dominant left hand, was recently fitted with a working tattoo machine prosthetic so he could resume work with his dominant hand.


Lynn
French tattoo artist JC Sheitan Tenet shows off his working tattoo machine prosthetic arm.

Neil Harbisson, who is colorblind, has an antenna in his skull that lets him “hear” color through audible vibrations. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology in partnership with a research arm of Microsoft Corp. MSFT, +0.72% recently developed a device called DuoSkin that looks like a metallic tattoo and duals as a trackpad for mobile devices. And Warwick is developing brain implants that can help predict and even alleviate tremors associated with Parkinson's disease.

Cyborg culture still flies largely under the radar, but investors and corporations have begun to take notice, funding and building products inspired by many of the same ideas.

Much of the mainstream investment so far has focused on tracking and improving health.

Google, for example, is working on a glucose-monitoring contact lens. MC10 recently released a smart Band-Aid-like adhesive called BioStamp Research Connect that helps researchers monitor heart rates and movement. Biotricity is developing a wearable called Biolife that can monitor heart rhythm, respiration, calories, temperature and physical activity while attached to a shirt or sports bra.

Grindhouse, meanwhile, is building an implantable device it calls Circadia, which records health data and transmits it via Bluetooth to Android devices. Grindhouse argues subdermal devices can collect more accurate data than devices that only sit atop the body, such as Apple Watch and Fitbit. It also believes that software currently being developed by other companies, such as Cisco System Inc. CSCO, -5.02% will make it easier to sift through and make sense of that data, helping doctors spot long-term health trends and perhaps one day even predict disease before symptoms appear.

All of these predictions come as global adoption of wearables is forecast to boom. Juniper Research, which tracks consumer technology trends, expects world-wide wearable shipments to reach 420 million by 2020, more than four times the 80 million shipped in 2015. A similar surge is predicted for medical devices, with shipments projected to triple to 70 million over the next four years.

 

By 2020, a third of health/life sciences and consumer product companies will begin to develop the first wave of products that integrate the human body with technology, according to recent predictions published by IDC, which tracks the consumer tech industry. IDC is referring to this industry as “augmented humanity,” and predicts the concept will go mainstream by the middle of next decade.

“The next four years are the ‘proto’ period where we’ll see proof of concept/prototype offerings,” said IDC chief analyst Frank Gens. “And the first Amazons, Googles, and Facebooks of the next era are likely to emerge.”

The increased interest is making it easier for companies to connect with potential investors. Grindhouse says it has been approached by several venture capitalists and physicians who have expressed interest in its work, though it declined to name them. Y Combinator, a Mountain View, Calif.-based accelerator of early stage startups, recently added human augmentation to its top-ten list of favored startup types it is seeking for investment opportunities.

Many of the more established companies MarketWatch reached out to for this story — including Apple, Fitbit FIT, -1.80% and Google — declined to comment, citing policies not to discuss future products or strategy. But many of their recent investments and products have illustrated interest in health technology and human augmentation.

In March, Apple launched CareKit, a platform that hosts apps designed to analyze health data produced by its smartwatch. The iOS app One Drop tracks glucose levels, food intake, medicine consumption and activity for patients with diabetes. Alphabet, meanwhile, went through a massive organizational restructuring in 2015 so it could invest more freely in experimental endeavors, including those in life sciences, such as its smart contact lenses.



Cisco was one of the only legacy companies that agreed to comment on this story, telling MarketWatch about an industrial-grade software platform it’s developing that would tie a broad spectrum of health data, including data from wearables, together for doctors in the cloud.

“Any data generated from those devices…and anything [a user does] across the continuum of care, will be sourced and put in the platform,” said Barbara Casey, who leads enterprise health care initiatives at Cisco. It will give doctors a “much more complete picture” of a patient, she said.

Battling regulation — and cultural taboos

To be sure, experts see speed bumps along the way. Companies “can see the potential profit,” said Warwick, whose experiments are funded by grants provided through Reading University, but there’s still consumer resistance to more invasive health technology, and companies may want to see more social acceptance before committing further.

Juniper, which helped coin the term “invisibles” in reference to dermal and subdermal wearables, expects the market to remain “embryonic” for a while, partly because most people haven’t thought twice about putting technology in their bodies.


  dangerousthings.com
Amal Graafstra's implanted RFID chips, seen on a 2006 on a 2006 X-ray.

Some of that may be due to dissatisfaction with current options. In 2014, Endeavour Partners estimated that activity trackers get abandoned after an average of six months. Users may be expressing fatigue with the overabundance of data produced by such devices without enough context telling them what it all means to their long-term health, said Juniper analyst James Moar.

Others believe medical-grade or invasive devices might end up being too expensive for many consumers, though that might be addressed if doctors write prescriptions for FDA-approved tech implants the way they might for, say, reading glasses. For the vast majority of people, though, current wrist-bound devices like Apple Watch, while they may be imperfect, are likely accurate enough, said Kate McCarthy, a Forrester Research health care IT analyst.

Also Read: Brain implants would make ‘The Matrix’ come to life
 
“It’s OK that there’s a degree of inaccuracy,” said McCarthy, who uses Apple Watch to manage her symptoms from Addison’s disease, a degenerative disorder that occurs when the body fails to produce sufficient levels of the hormone cortisol. “It’s close enough for me to do the things I need to do.”

There are also regulatory concerns. In July, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it won’t scrutinize “low risk,” outside-the-body, health wearables that don’t purport to produce professional-grade medical data. But implants that claim such accuracy would likely face rigorous approval processes. Invasive products — those that “penetrate or pierce the skin or mucous membranes of the body,” according to the FDA — and those that claim to help treat a specific medical condition, could take months or even years to reach consumers.

Still, advocates for the biohacking and transhumanism movements say consumers and Fortune 500 companies are warming to the potential of next-generation, health-monitoring devices. Ryan O’Shea, Grindhouse’s head of media, believes demand will increase as devices get more advanced and personal and the mechanisms to understand health data are improved.
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“We’ve been directing human evolution since we invented fire.” Ryan O’Shea, Grindhouse Wetworks




“When you have a device that’s going to be able to get accurate blood oxygen levels, blood pressure, heart rate, and then kick it out to your devices — perhaps even alert a doctor — people are really going to see the benefit,” he said. “It could save a life.”

Also See: Biohackers implant computers, earbuds and antenna in their bodies
 
That would mean an end to “measuring your activity for activity’s sake” like people do now with Fitbits, said MC10 co-founder Rooz Ghaffari. Increasingly, data will be gathered with purpose, which will help doctors provide better preventive care and help people manage their disabilities, he said.

Warwick and O’Shea both believe technological advances will give humanity an evolutionary boost similar to that provided by eyeglasses, pacemakers, prosthetic limbs and medicine. Warwick, for example, is studying how ultrasound might be used to help blind people navigate their surroundings.

“We’ve been directing human evolution since we invented fire,” said O’Shea. “The whole medical industry is a biohacking industry. We just don’t call it that.”

A ‘sixth sense’ for things others can’t feel

After Zack Watson finished implanting my magnet, I tested his work by lifting a needle with my finger’s magnetic pull. It dangled there, and I laughed, amused that I could now do magic tricks and freak people out at bars. Later, in a dingy unfinished basement in the unassuming home Cannon rents 30 minutes from downtown Pittsburgh that serves as Grindhouse’s lab, Cannon sent Morse code messages to my magnet using a device called Bottlenose his company developed that emits vibrations through electromagnetic fields.

The magnet’s purpose, I quickly realized, was not to pick up small metal objects and amaze my friends -- though I still do that -- but to sense things others can’t.


  Scott Goldsmith
Jennifer Booton feels magnetic pulses in her finger in Grindhouse’s basement labs.

Steve Haworth, a pioneer of subdermal implants who sells the specially coated magnets to body artists and does his own body modification work in Phoenix, says the magnetic implant grants its users a sixth sense, allowing them to detect waves emitted by motors and electrical equipment that are invisible to others. My finger often tingles near microwaves, laptops and smartphones.

Also Watch: Bodyhackers implant RFID chips to customize themselves
 
My implant officially makes me part of the cyborg culture, Cannon assured me. He encouraged me to participate in web forums and Facebook groups and share my healing progress and experiences, saying that exchange of data is crucial to the movement’s advancement.
shareable a écrit:


“You’re talking about extending your body to its maximum potential. And then beyond.” Grindhouse Wetworks co-founder Tim Cannon





I sat with Cannon as his team gathered in his basement and a few others from around the world tuned in via Google Hangouts for their weekly meeting. They were dissecting the various components of their ambitious biotech projects when we launched into a discussion about the far-off future of wearable technologies. They told me how they imagine a world in which implants are so in tune with our bodies they’ll engage a home’s heater before a user even realizes they’re cold. Screens, they imagine, might just be projections of our own imagination, placed in our line of vision by chips in our eyes.

These aren’t just lunatic predictions from a group of science fiction fans: Piper Jaffray analyst Gene Munster recently predicted something similar, saying in a note to clients this summer that he believes some sort of wearable — likely glasses or contact lenses — will “replace the majority of screens in our everyday lives” within 10 years.

“There’s a lot of money to be made just around the corner,” said Marlo Webber, a Grindhouse engineer who moved from Australia to Pittsburgh earlier this year to be closer to the action.

“The possibilities,” Cannon said, “are endless.”

MarketWatch Partner Center

Jennifer Booton
Jennifer Booton is a MarketWatch reporter based in New York. You can follow her on Twitter @jbooton.

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/i-joined-an-underground-medical-movement-b…


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WHAT!? MARK OF THE BEAST PROMO IN CHRISTIAN CHURCH (R$E)



VIDEO : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rtaelU_ZDPM

UNBELIEVABLE! Illuminati "Mark of the Beast" Promo by a 'Christian' Church! (2016)

Released two days ago (17 November, 2016) - this new advertisement by Elevation church "Beyond" is Luciferian propaganda. Come out of her, my people.


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