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TECHNOLOGIE RFID DISSIMULÉE DANS LES BIENS DE CONSOMMATION.... + BRACELET (PARTIE 2)
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MessagePosté le: Mar 12 Mai - 08:42 (2015)    Sujet du message: SALES EXEC SAYS SHE WAS FIRED FOR UNINSTALLING GPS APP THAT TRACKED HER CONSTANTLY Répondre en citant

SALES EXEC SAYS SHE WAS FIRED FOR UNINSTALLING GPS APP THAT TRACKED HER CONSTANTLY

By Lily Hay Newman


Employee whereabouts are at your fingertips.
Image from StepanPopov/Shutterstock

It might sometimes feel like your boss is always on your case, but this is a whole other level. A former sales executive from the wire-transfer company Intermex alleges in a lawsuit filed May 5 that she was fired for uninstalling an app that tracked her whereabouts 24/7 and sent the data to her supervisor.

Lily Hay Newman is a staff writer and the lead blogger for Future Tense.

According to the suit, which was spotted by Ars Technica, Intermex made employees install the Xora GPS app so the company could track them at all times. Myrna Arias claims that she told her boss, John Stubits, that she was fine with the tracking while she was on duty, but opposed to it during her off hours and weekends. The suit alleges that a group of co-workers agreed with this position. After doing some research about Xora, Arias uninstalled the app in April 2014.

The suit, filed in Kern County Superior Court, claims privacy violations, wrongful termination, and other labor infractions. It outlines damages of more than $500,000 for lost wages. “What we have here is a really egregious situation,” Arias’s attorney Gail Glick told Courthouse News Service. The suit says:

After researching the app and speaking with a trainer from Xora, Plaintiff and her co-workers asked whether Intermex would be monitoring their movements while off duty. Stubits admitted that employees would be monitored while off duty and bragged that he knew how fast she was driving at specific moments ever since she installed the app on her phone.

ClickSoftware, which makes the product Xora StreetSmart, seems to envision its product as a 9-to-5 tool, not a full-time surveillance service. The company has not responded to a request for comment. Its website says, “When your field employees start their day, they simply launch the application on their mobile devices.” But the potential for invasive abuse of the product is there. “See the location of every mobile worker on a Google Map. You can drill down on an individual worker to see where they have been, the route they have driven and where they are now,” the site explains.

Mobile phones have made it cheap, easy, and appealing for employers, insurance companies, and other groups to track their affiliates. But concerns about these programs are extensive and include the danger of unforeseen privacy violations, in addition to the obvious ones like your boss finding out that ran an errand during work, or your insurance finding out that you visit a smoke shop a few times a week. As one of my Slate colleagues said, “If that [lawsuit] is even close to what actually happened, it is terrifying.”

Future Tense is a partnership of Slate, New America, and Arizona State University.

http://www.slate.com/blogs/future_tense/2015/05/11/intermex_employee_says_s…


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MessagePosté le: Jeu 21 Mai - 14:17 (2015)    Sujet du message: TRACKING DEVICE FRIES CAR ELECTRONICS CLAIMS THOUSANDS Répondre en citant

TRACKING DEVICE FRIES CAR ELECTRONICS CLAIMS THOUSANDS

Ajoutée le 21 mai 2015

In the name of safety, insurance companies have begun putting tracking devices that measure & record drivers’ actions. They promise discounts on insurance, but thousands claim the devices fried their car’s electronics or suddenly shut the engine off while they were driving, leaving them without power steering or power brakes. Is it yet another “safety” device like the 34 million air bags just recalled, or is it a grab for control and money to Track-n-Tax your movement?

http://www.infowars.com/progressive-i...

http://boston.cbslocal.com/2015/05/18...

http://apnews.myway.com/article/20150...

VIDEO : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oeh4XTtq2bs


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MessagePosté le: Mer 17 Juin - 03:14 (2015)    Sujet du message: THE PROMISE OF WEARABLES IN LAW ENFORCEMENT Répondre en citant

THE PROMISE OF WEARABLES IN LAW ENFORCEMENT

3.33 = 666. Stange things are happening at 3.33h.


Fitness trackers, from left, Basis Peak, Adidas Fit Smart, Fitbit Charge, Sony SmartBand, and Jawbone Move, are posed for a photo next to an iPhone. // Bebeto Matthews/AP

By Mohana Ravindranath June 9, 2015
NEXTGOV

Customs and Border Protection ‎Chief Technology Officer Wolf Tombe thinks wrist-worn fitness trackers -- like the Fitbit or the Samsung Gear Fit he wears -- could enhance law enforcement agencies' ability to respond to officers' needs. 

During a recent panel, Tombe described how the device, which automatically monitors biometric factors such as heart rate and steps taken, could tip off a dispatcher about each officer's physical condition. 

For instance, if Tombe's baseline heart rate was usually 60 beats per minute, “what if my heart rate . . . went to over 100 beats?"

A sophisticated, connected system of wearable devices could send a text alert to dispatchers or other responders, notifying them an officer might be in jeopardy. Those devices could also be connected to a virtual map of dispatched officers, automatically changing their status from a green dot to a red one if the device senses the wearer is in danger, he added. 

"That kind of data has true power," Tombe said.

Later in the panel, Tombe added that he was also interested in fabric that can detect the force of impact experienced by the wearer. This kind of technology is currently marketed to children's sports teams, especially to detect potential damage caused by flung baseball bats, but it could be especially useful in law enforcement, he said. 

http://www.nextgov.com/emerging-tech/2015/06/dhs-officials-vision-law-enfor…


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MessagePosté le: Mer 29 Juil - 05:13 (2015)    Sujet du message: 470,000 VEHICLES AND 900 MILLION ANDROIDS OPEN TO HACK Répondre en citant

470,000 VEHICLES AND 900 MILLION ANDROIDS OPEN TO HACK 



VIDEO : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yxpmZOR24G8

Android hack http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2zl...
Jeep hack
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2zl...


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MessagePosté le: Mer 16 Sep - 03:08 (2015)    Sujet du message: MUST HEAR: NANOPARTICLES IN EVERYONE ; HEALTH EFFECTS, & WHAT YOU CAN DO TO ELIMINATE THE DANGERS Répondre en citant

MUST HEAR: NANOPARTICLES IN EVERYONE ; HEALTH EFFECTS, & WHAT YOU CAN DO TO ELIMINATE THE DANGERS



VIDEO : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WnOZhpRRBuY


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MessagePosté le: Mer 23 Sep - 12:30 (2015)    Sujet du message: DHS WANTS BOEING TO TEST A BRAIN CHIP IN FIRM'S SELF-DESTRUCTING 'BLACK SPYPHONE' Répondre en citant

DHS WANTS BOEING TO TEST A BRAIN CHIP IN FIRM'S SELF-DESTRUCTING 'BLACK SPYPHONE'


bestfoto77/Shutterstock.com

By Aliya Sternstein September 22, 2015
NEXTGOV

The Department of Homeland Security is funding a Boeing company to create a "brain chip" for its self-destructing Black smartphone that could be adapted for any device, DHS officials say.

The technology powering the devices potentially could identify the user’s walking style, for example. Officials would be alerted if the gait does not match the authorized user’s walk – a red flag the phone might have fallen into the wrong hands, officials said. 

The "secret sauce" of the mobile device is a so-called neuromorphic computer chip that simulates human learning, Vincent Sritapan, the program manager for DHS' mobile device security program, told Nextgov.

Gait recognition -- driven by the phone's accelerometer, GPS and the chip -- is but one of many kinds of continuous ID verification intended to tighten access controls on mobile devices.   

Boeing and HRL Laboratories, a software firm jointly owned by Boeing and General Motors, are partnering under a DHS project worth $2.2 million over 2.5 years. 

The companies "pretty much are leveraging user behavior information" from data gathered by sensors found on any standard consumer smartphone, Sritapan said. Those feelers could include microphones, cameras and touchpads, he added. The artificial intelligence could help agencies determine, “Are you who you say you are, and do we give you access to enterprise resources like email?” he said.

Homeland Security chose the Boeing Black for experimentation, because the company was willing to embed the chip into its device, Sritapan said.

"I would call this a high-risk, high-reward type of project," he added. "If successful, this technology can go into any device the manufacturers are willing to integrate it with" and would meet military, DHS and other federal agency information security specifications. 

Referring to the Black as "the test body," he said the government purchased the brand for "specific uses," such as secure voice calls. 

Smartphone as Test Tube

It remains to be seen whether DHS itself will buy brain chip-embedded Blacks for operations in the field. If the chip is successful at the end of a 2-year research and development period, DHS and Boeing will share the cost of a 6-month pilot program, Sritapan said. 

State Department staffers apparently plan to or are currently using the Black.

"Boeing's team will provide a two-consecutive day Discovery Workshop that includes a Boeing Black product overview, technical deep dives and a security requirements analysis," department officials said in a solicitation for a Boeing Black Secure Voice Workshop released Monday. 

Other players in the military-grade smartphone space include the similarly-named Blackphone made by Silent Circle, an encrypted communications provider co-founded by the inventor of PGP encryption and a former Navy Seal. Android-based Samsung smartphones running the firm’s Knox security software are another option for Pentagon components. 

Defense Department Chief Information Officer Terry Halvorsen has previously said DOD plans to test top-secret smartphones in the fall. 

The smartphone AI under development also would continuously track unusual digital transactions, like an app meddling with the operating system or a spike in network traffic, DHS officials said.

MIT Technology Review describes the way neuromorphic chips understand the world as basically cognition: "Like the neurons in your own brain, those on HRL’s chip adjust their synaptic connections when exposed to new data. In other words, the chip learns through experience."

Their low-power consumption makes the chips especially attractive for smartphones that sap batteries, experts say. 

Last fall, HRL Laboratories test-piloted a miniature drone with a Defense-funded prototype neuromorphic chip inside. The unmanned aircraft learned to recognize three different rooms it had never entered before by memorizing their wall patterns.

A Black-Blackberry Connection?

The phone in which the thinking-chip will be tested is straight out of a James Bond movie. The Black completely erases itself if it detects human or technical tampering. It looks like a common, touchscreen Android smartphone, but the hardware and software inside can be custom-tailored to an agency’s or company's specific needs. In the DHS model, the hidden innards will consist of the neuromorphic chip and associated software. 

Government smartphone stalwart BlackBerry – stepping back from device production – announced last year it will provide software services for Black. BlackBerry this month bought Good Technology, a mobile security software provider widely used in the public sector. Good and BlackBerry combined represented 19 percent of the $1.4 billion mobile management software sector last year. 

On Tuesday, Boeing officials said in an emailed statement, "Boeing has developed a secure, mobile solution that is designed to meet the needs of defense and security customers. Due to customer sensitivities, we cannot disclose who is currently using the device or considering a purchase."

(Image via bestfoto77/ Shutterstock.com)

http://www.nextgov.com/cybersecurity/2015/09/dhs-wants-boeing-test-brain-ch…


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MessagePosté le: Dim 4 Oct - 06:00 (2015)    Sujet du message: LA TIMES: WEARING BEAST TRACKING TECHNOLOGY WHILE BEING FASHIONABLE AND COOL. Répondre en citant

LA TIMES: WEARING BEAST TRACKING TECHNOLOGY WHILE BEING FASHIONABLE AND COOL.



VIDEO : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JZDwQmMBoUE


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MessagePosté le: Lun 5 Oct - 11:14 (2015)    Sujet du message: REMARKS ANNOUNCING A NEW MANUFACTURING INNOVATION INSTITUTE IN SILICON VALLEY Répondre en citant



Secretary of Defense Speech

REMARKS ANNOUNCING A NEW MANUFACTURING INNOVATION INSTITUTE IN SILICON VALLEY 

...
When I began my career, most technology of consequence originated in America, and a lot of that was sponsored by the government, particularly by the Defense Department. Today, much more of our technology is commercial, and the technology base is global. And other countries have been trying to catch up to the breakthroughs that for the last several decades made our military more advanced than any other.

Indeed, technologies once long possessed by only the most formidable militaries have now gotten into the hands of previously less-capable forces, and even non-state actors. Meanwhile, nations like Russia and China are modernizing their forces to try to close the technology gap. And our reliance on things like satellites and the Internet can lead to real vulnerabilities in space and cyberspace that our adversaries are eager to exploit.

So here’s what we’re doing to stay ahead of those challenges and to stay the best. We’re investing aggressively in innovation. We’re pushing the envelope with research into new technologies – on robotics, data science, cybersecurity, biotech, hypersonic engines that can fly over five times the speed of sound, and I could go on. We’re drilling tunnels through that wall that sometimes seems to separate government from scientists and commercial technologists – making it more permeable so more of America’s brightest minds can contribute to our mission of national defense, even if only for a time. And we’re developing new partnerships with America’s private sector and tech communities, particularly here in Silicon Valley.

One of the keys to this place, to Silicon Valley, is colocation, which I see every time I visit and which I experienced firsthand when I was living and working here just last year. Everyone’s in the same area, which not only helps forge relationships, but also helps spread new ideas. And that close geographic proximity, coupled with strong links between academia and industry, has made this entire region a nexus for creativity – an innovation ecosystem.

Our government has historically been part of this, too, with DoD and government investments helping spur ground-up innovation in Silicon Valley – funding research that, for example, grew into things like GPS, or more recently Google’s self-driving cars, Apple’s virtual assistant Siri, and on and on.

Now, obviously none of this diminishes the genius, the hard work, the tremendous effort by the innovators themselves, in San Jose, Cupertino, Mountain View, here, or for that matter Cambridge, Massachusetts, and America’s other great hubs of innovation. The government helped ignite the spark, but these were the places that nurtured the flames that created incredible applications.

I’m announcing that the Department of Defense is partnering with FlexTech Alliance – a consortium of 96 companies, 41 universities, 14 state and local government organizations, and 11 labs and non-profits – to establish a new manufacturing innovation institute focused on flexible hybrid electronics. This is an emerging technology that takes advanced flexible materials for circuits, communications, sensors, and power, and combines them with thinned silicon chips to ultimately produce the next generation of electronic products.

The Defense Department is making a $75 million-dollar investment, which has already been matched and actually exceeded by tens of millions of dollars in contributions from our public- and private-sector partners, represented here. And like the six other Manufacturing Innovation Institutes established by President Obama over the last three years – four of which DoD helped lead, in areas like 3D printing, lightweight metals, integrated photonics, and digital manufacturing and design – this one will ensure that pioneering innovations needed to develop, manufacture, and commercialize these cutting-edge electronics will happen right here in America. I’ve talked to the President personally about these institutes on a number of occasions – he takes a personal interest in them, you might be interested to know – and I know how important it is to him that America keeps leading in manufacturing innovation and continues to bring great manufacturing jobs back home.

With over 30 of the partner organizations having a presence between San Jose and the Golden Gate Bridge – including companies along the alphabet from Apple to Lockheed Martin to Xerox – the institute will be headquartered here in Silicon Valley. And it will also leverage leading and emerging innovation ecosystems across the country – places like Boston, Chicago, Detroit, and northeast Ohio.

Flexible hybrid electronics have enormous potential for our defense mission. For example, our industry partners will be able to shape electronics to things, after decades of having to do it the other way around. By seamlessly printing lightweight, flexible structural integrity sensors right onto the surfaces of ships and aircraft, for example, or folding them into cracks and crevices where rigid circuit boards and bulky wiring could never fit, we’ll be able to have real-time damage reports – making the stuff of science fiction, in that sense, into reality. Our troops will be able to lighten their loads with sensors and electronic gear embedded in their clothing, and wounded warriors will benefit from smart prosthetics that have the full flexibility of human skin.

The reality is, though, that as I stand here in front of you today, we don’t know all the applications this new technology will make possible – that’s the remarkable thing about innovation – and that’s another reason why America, and America’s military, must get there first.

The commercial applications will be just as transformative, if not more so, given the impact of wearables, Internet-of-Things, and so on. Smart bandages that can analyze a patient’s biomarkers in their sweat will help doctors catch infections earlier. Stretchable sensors can be put on cars, bridges, and buildings to help keep people safe. Flexible medical diagnostics for x-rays and breast cancer tests will be more accurate and less painful. And instead of tracking athletic performance with bulky devices on our wrists, flexible electronics coupled with new, revolutionary fibers and textiles will let us embed washable, wearable, featherweight sensors in our clothes – giving us an even clearer picture of our health and fitness.

This new partnership is only the latest of what we’re doing to rebuild the bridge between the Pentagon and the technology community.

After this, I’m going across the street – right here – to host the first corporate roundtable at the headquarters of what I think of as my new start-up, the Defense Innovative Unit Experimental, or DIUx, which I announced at Stanford University in April and now is open for business. Located here at Moffett Field, its proximity to the Valley will be key to its success in helping start-ups and other companies here partner with us.

And later today I’ll visit LinkedIn, to discuss and learn how DoD can better compete for talented Americans who want to contribute to our mission – because as I said, it’s not just about the best technology. We need the best people, too.

This is an exciting time – it reminds me of the kind of collaboration between companies, universities, and government that built the Internet and GPS, or in an earlier era, as I said, communications satellites and the jet engine.

For those interested in foreign policy and national security, there are lots of interesting challenges and problems to work on. And that’s also true for those interested in technology. The intersection of the two is an opportunity-rich environment.

These issues matter. They have to do with our protection and our security, and creating a world in which our fellow citizens can live their lives and dream their dreams and hug their children and give them a better future.

Helping defend your country and making a better world is one of the noblest things a person can do. And we’re grateful to all of you for doing that with us.

Thank you.

http://www.defense.gov/News/Speeches/Speech-View/Article/615268/remarks-ann…



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MessagePosté le: Sam 9 Avr - 04:24 (2016)    Sujet du message: OFFICIAL : DHS LOOKING TO SILICON VALLEY FOR HELP ON INTERNET OF THINGS SECURITY Répondre en citant

OFFICIAL : DHS LOOKING TO SILICON VALLEY FOR HELP ON INTERNET OF THINGS SECURITY


a-image/Shutterstock.com

By Mohana Ravindranath April 7, 2016
NEXTGOV


The Homeland Security Department's efforts to connect with Silicon Valley startups could help it protect the Internet of Things, an official said Wednesday.

“Right now, the Internet of Things is taking off," Reginald Brothers, DHS’ undersecretary for Science and Technology, said during a Senate hearing on the agency's budget. "We don’t want to be left behind, in terms of how we think about security. We’re aggressively pushing forward." 

During the hearing, Sen. John Hoeven, R-N.D., asked Brothers how DHS prevents security vulnerabilities from spreading throughout the connected network of electronic devices, sensors and everyday objects known as the Internet of Things -- specifically, which “failsafes and protection” the department was investigating for the network.

In DHS’ trips to Silicon Valley, where the department recently opened a new outpost, “We said, ‘what if we engage the folks who are actually doing the development work on the Internet of Things, and talk to them about security," Brothers testified. "What are their concerns?” 

Conversations with industry working groups surfaced a handful of concerns, including secure ways to detect new connections and authenticating components to determine if they’re legitimate.

DHS is working with the tech sector to understand “the role we should play here,” Brothers said.

http://www.nextgov.com/cio-briefing/2016/04/official-dhs-looking-silicon-valley-help-internet-things-security/127321/?oref=nextgov_cio_briefing


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MessagePosté le: Mar 13 Sep - 04:40 (2016)    Sujet du message: HOW WILL TERRORISTS USE THE INTERNET OF THINGS? THE JUSTICE DEPARTMENT IS TRYING TO FIGURE THAT OUT Répondre en citant

HOW WILL TERRORISTS USE THE INTERNET OF THINGS? THE JUSTICE DEPARTMENT IS TRYING TO FIGURE THAT OUT 


 
Orhan Cam/Shutterstock.com

By Patrick Tucker Defense One September 9, 2016
NEXTGOV

By 2020, there will be anywhere from 20 billion to 50 billion internet-connected devices, including about one in five cars and or trucks, according to industry forecasts. That’s big business for outfits that sell data or streaming services. For the Justice Department, it’s 50 billion potential problems.

“In our division, we’ve just started a group looking at nothing but the internet of things.” John P. Carlin, the U.S. assistant attorney general for national security, told the Intelligence and National Security Alliance on Thursday at the group’s annual summit.

“There isn’t a set number of participants for the team and we are going to pursue this initiative within our existing appropriation and budget,” Justice Department spokesperson Marc Raimondi told Defense One.

Carlin framed the issue as directly related to next-generation terrorism.

“Look at the terrorist attack in Nice, Rolling Eyes ” he said. “If our trucks are running in an automated fashion—great efficiencies, great safety, on the one hand—but if we don’t think about how terrorists could exploit that on the front end, and not after they take a truck and run it through a crowd of civilians, we’ll regret it. Rolling Eyes

“We made that mistake once when we moved all of our data, when we digitally connected it and didn’t focus on how … terrorists and spies could exploit it,” he said, referring broadly to the growing abilities of state and nonstate actors to steal data and put it to nefarious use. “We’re playing catch-up,” he said. “We can’t do that again when it comes to the internet of things, actual missiles, trucks and cars.”

But there are already thousands of vulnerable vehicles on today’s roads.

Computer researchers Chris Valazek and Charlie Miller have been demonstrating how to hack various car models for years, including a famous 2013 "Today" show segment, and a 2015 demonstration in which they took control of a Jeep traveling along a highway at 70 mph with Wired writer Andy Greenberg inside. Miller has calculated that as many as 471,000 existing vehicles have some exploitable computer vulnerability.

Of course, Justice isn’t the only government agency sweating over the internet of things.

In 2012, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency launched a program called the High Assurance Cyber Military Systems, or HACMS, to fix vulnerabilities that could pervade future internet of things devices. Two years later, Dawn Meyerriecks, the deputy director of the CIA’s directorate of science and technology, noted that “smart refrigerators have been used in distributed denial of service attacks,” and cited smart fluorescent LEDs that “are communicating that they need to be replaced but are also being hijacked for other things.”

The National Security Agency, too, is looking to the internet of things… for completely different reasons. When Defense One sat down with Rick Ledgett, the deputy director of NSA, back in June and asked him if the internet of things presented “a security nightmare or a signals intelligence bonanza,” he answered simply, “both.”

http://www.nextgov.com/defense/2016/09/how-will-terrorists-use-internet-thi…


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MessagePosté le: Aujourd’hui à 14:31 (2016)    Sujet du message: TECHNOLOGIE RFID DISSIMULÉE DANS LES BIENS DE CONSOMMATION.... + BRACELET (PARTIE 2)

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